How will overuse of resources show up in the economy?

On a number of occasions this web log has noted the Living Planet report and its claim that we are currently using 150 per cen of the resources that the planet will sustain.  If this is true, how is it going to affect the economy and how will we notice it?

It may be that the quantity theory of money can help us.  This theory states that

MV=PQ

Where
M is the amount of money in circulation
V is the velocity at which the money is exchanged in the economy
P is the prices at which goods and services change hands
Q is the quantity of goods and services produced.

If we are using resources faster than they can be replaced where will it show up in this equation?

The first place to look is on the PQ side.  As the demand for resources increases, and as resources become more difficult to extract or produce then we can expect prices to increase.

There may also be shortages or declines in some components of Q  some resources will be at or near depletion and many will require increasing amounts of energy to extract.  This again will cause an increase in prices.

On the other side of the equation velocity is difficult or impossible to  measure so we have to ignore it.  Money supply is also difficult to measure.  Definitions  usually start with cash in circullation and demand deposits in the banks known as M1.  However, other types of deposits are often added to M1 sot that we can have multiple defitions of money – your choice.  Money is created when the banks make loans and central banks try to control the total by purchasing or selling government bonds.

One thing is clear:  changes in the Q part of the equation are going to force changes on the other three variables.  If there are stressful or abrupt changes in Q, there will probably be turmoil in the financial side of the economy.  We probably need to evaluate what is happening to Q in physical rather than monetary terms.

We should also note that changes in M can affect production of goods and services. For example, what would happen to the North American food factory if a failure in the banking system were to prevent farmers from getting the loans to put chemicals on their crops?  Also a major drop in the money supply (such as probably happened with the housing crisis a couple of years ago would and did create turmoil in the economy.

So if we are using resources at a faster rate than they can be replaced how are we likely to notice it?  Overall there will probably be a steady rise in prices and a steady decline in living standards,  unless there is a huge major shock  to the system.  Also where there are localized shocks such as earthquakes, tsunamis  or an electro magnetic pulse from the sun (forecast for sometime in the next two or three years) we can expect major drops in local standards of living as people will find it difficult to recover.

As time passes, more and more people will be faced with a lower standard of living.  But people being people, some will prosper.  The rich will continue to get richer and the poor will continue to get poorer.

Wouldn’t life be nicer for everyone if we could go back to the golden years of prosperity?

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