Capitalism – a meaningless concept in which we can believe

As one surfs the economic forums of Medium and other media one often sees the word “capitalism” in the headlines but mostly I ignore these items because the word’s definitions are generally so vague the word is meaningless.  Because capitalism is such a meaningless word it is something in which we can believe while ignoring a less pleasant reality.

When we study economics we can try for an honest understanding so we can solve problems and reduce human suffering or we can seek rationalizations for things which will make us rich in spite of exploiting others, destroying the environment and overusing scarce resources.  If I were the chief executive of a large corporation or a politician I would want the second approach to economics.  Guess who pays the salaries of most economists.  This blogger makes no money out of his study of economics, so he can take the first approach.

The main feature of the economic organization with which most of us are familiar is that a lot of it is based on legislation which restricts competition.  Patents, copyright, licensing and subsidies all work to restrict competition  and/or distort prices.  These are so pervasive that we cannot say we have competitive market economy.

The problem with a perfectly competitive economy is that it does not allow for profits.  Competition reduces profits until each firm makes wages and a return on investment but no profits.  If one wants profits one needs government to pass legislation to restrict competition and most current  governments are happy to oblige.  Once upon a time this blogger used to make pottery.  I suggested that in order to make a good living we should form the Canadian Potters Association and get the government to pass legislation that all the people in Canada should eat only from dishes make by members.  Other potters laughed but lots of other occupations have that legislation: teachers, doctors, lawyers, septic tank installers, most large corporations (patents and copyright), etc.

Like lots of other people I would like to see an economy with more equality and less exploitation.  I believe the best way to get it would be to have more competition.  To get there we should repeal or at least reduce copyright, patent and licensing legislation and drop all subsidies.

This would leave many people exposed to economic adjustments which often cause suffering. A guaranteed income scheme would be a better way of coping with these problems than restricting competition.

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A guaranteed income – another impossible dream

I believe the arguments in favor of a universal income scheme are overwhelming.  The problem is this belief is not shared by everyone.  I would go even further than an income scheme and say there is an urgent need to reform the way in which we create money and the two reforms should be combined.

Our survival and our enjoyment of life depends upon our being able to provide ourselves with food, shelter, clothing and smart phones.  The way in which we do this involves a lot of complex relationships with people we do not know.   As, for the most part,  we do not understand how these relationships work,  any attempt to change them will be a threat and arouse a lot of fierce emotions.  On top of that a lot of people have a vested interest in the current way of exchanging goods and services and will resist change.

It may be impossible to overcome these problems, but is that a good reason to not discuss them and to not try?  With current economic trends it could be that changes will be forced upon us and maybe we should try to influence them rather than just let them happen.

The essay “LETS go to market; Dealing with the economic crisis”  on this weblog deals with a proposal for a guarantee income scheme and how it could be combined with a different way of creating money.  Do have a look at it.

A major question around an income scheme is how much work needs to be done.  Modern technology has reduced the amount of labor needed for survival.  I think we are at the point where a lot of work is just for the sake of working to satisfy the work ethic.  The work ethic allows a lot of people to build empires to fulfill their own ambitions.  The work ethic is unnecessary and makes a lot of people into slaves.

A guaranteed income scheme would be a major transfer of decision-making power to individuals because having money allows people to make decisions.    No longer would people be dependent upon an employer for their total income.  No longer would we be slaves to employers.  We would be able to decide what we want to do with our time.

An income scheme would deal with problems of poverty, inequality and economic inefficiencies.  With an income scheme there would no longer be a case for subsidies to producers and this would remove a lot of price distortions from the economy.  The result would be a more efficient economy.

Value is determined by supply and demand.  As all of us have a limited lifespan time should be the most valuable thing we have.  Therefore we should by trying to use modern technology to give us more time in which to do the things we most enjoy.  Instead it seems modern technology is mostly being used to sell us more smart phones which are used to sell us more junk.  That’s stupid.

Subsidies distort prices

Here is a  news report that the Quebec government is giving a $58 million subsidy to an asbestos mine in that province.

I am opposed to this subsidy because I believe subsidies should be given to consumers rather than producers.

Subsidies given to producers distort prices and encourage us to make poor purchasing decisions.

The article says there are “predictions that worldwide demand for asbestos would increase — especially in India — while the supply would drop.”  If this is correct then prices would go up and the mine would be able to reopen without subsidies.

Subsidies should be given to consumers in the form of a guaranteed income scheme or a negative income tax,

 

If you liked this post your are invited to comment, press the like button and/or click  one of the share buttons. If you disagree you are invited to say why in a comment.  While I like the idea of sharing this platform, my personality is such that I don’t reply to many comments.

A guaranteed income scheme

This writer has long been in favor of a guaranteed income scheme in part because I believe subsidies should be given to consumers rather than producers.

Therefore I am pleased to provide you with this link to a report on a recent congress on a basic income guarantee.

Not only is there a need for an income scheme there is also a need for  changes in the way we create money in our economy. The two should go together.

I have tried to show a way in which the two could be combined in my essay “LETS go to market: dealing with the economic crisis.”

At a time when the economy is clearly going down there is a need to provide support for everyone.  There is also a need for economic efficiency and an overwhelming need to fix a sick financial system.

Jobs or a guaranteed income

The Huffington post has started a series entitled 20 ways to put America back to work.

Politically, economically, and morally, there is no issue of more importance in this country right now than jobs. One in 10 American workers is officially unemployed, not even counting another 7 percent or so who’ve given up looking or can only find work part-time. More than a third of the unemployed haven’t had work in more than six months.

I suggest the real problem is to ensure everyone has a reasonable standard of living as it may not be realistic to say there can be jobs for everyone. Subsidies should be given to consumers rather than producers possibly through some sort of guaranteed annual income scheme.

Funding for the arts

We have recently had a little spat here in British Columbia over funding for the arts with the government cutting back and then restoring some of its funding.

The basic principle that subsidies should be given to consumers rather than producers applies here as elsewhere. Some sort of guaranteed income scheme would allow those who want to be artists to pursue their dreams as they see fit. Is’nt there an old saying about paying the piper and calling the tune?

Following are links to an article and a column dealing with this in Saturday’s Vancouver Sun.

The article

The column

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